Consensus-based clinical research priorities for emergency nursing in Australia

Prof. Julie Considine1, Prof Kate Curtis2, Prof Ramon Shaban3, Prof Margaret Fry4

1School of Nursing and Midwifery and Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University – Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research – Eastern Health Partnership, Melbourne, Australia, 2Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney – Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, Sydney, Australia , 3Sydney Nursing School and Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, The University of Sydney – Western Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia, 4Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney – Northern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia

Background

Research is vital to responding to contemporary challenges of providing safe, high quality emergency nursing care, yet the research priorities for emergency nursing practice in Australia are unknown.  The aim of this study was to establish research priorities for Australian emergency nursing.

Methods

A two-phase descriptive, exploratory study was conducted: research themes were identified through a survey of 232 emergency nurses and the Delphi Technique (2 rounds) was used to rank and prioritise the research themes.

Results

In Phase 1, 566 clinical practice challenges identified by 232 emergency nurses were distilled into 48 research themes. In Phase 2, the Delphi Technique (2 rounds, n=131 emergency nurses) was used to rank and prioritise the research themes identified in Phase 1. Five research themes had a content validity index (CVI) ≥0.90: (i) recognising and responding to deteriorating ED patients; (ii) effect of access block on clinical care of admitted ICU patients; (iii) effects of ED overcrowding on clinical care; (iv) scope of practice of specialist emergency nurses; and (v) effect of access block on clinical care of admitted ward patients. These are reflected in four broad research priority areas: professional issues, patient safety, emergency care of vulnerable populations, and healthcare system issues.

Conclusion

The four research priority areas enable research foci based on a robust and evidence-based approach. Future research should focus on these priority areas in partnership with other emergency disciplines to enable safe, high quality emergency care, and, to inform emergency nursing practice in Australia.


Biography:

Professor Julie Considine is Deakin University’s Professor of Nursing at Eastern Heath, one of Victoria’s largest health care services. Julie has held clinical, education and research roles in emergency nursing over the last two decades and internationally recognised as a leader in research and education in emergency care. Julie has over 180 publications and has attracted over $5.2M in research and project funding. Julie is a Founding Fellow of the College of Emergency Nursing Australasia (CENA), and in 2013 was awarded the Julie Finucane OAM Medal for leadership in emergency nursing and commitment to CENA. She is a Deputy Editor of the Australasian Emergency Care, represents the College of Emergency Nursing Australasia on the Australian Resuscitation Council, and is a member of the International Liaison Committee of Resuscitation Basic Life Support TaskForce.